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ground among the economists where we are going to end at the end of the date. thank you for joining us very much, and thank you all. we appreciate peterson foundation allowed me to participate and i know that pete has a conversation to wrap things up. >> as i contemplated how to close i remember the nobel prize winner of the university of chicago where i was presumably educated. if you have no alternative you have no problem. so i thought about the alternative of delivering the letter delivered to dramatically of course. thank you very much. i deeply appreciate quality of the panel but also the quality of the audience. so thank you and goodbye. [applause] >> president obama met at the white house with key congressional leaders including house speaker john boehner, house democratic leader nancy pelosi, senate majority leader harry reid and a republican mitch mcconnell. the first meeting since the election. they discussed what to do about expiring busheir tax reductions and across-the-board spending cuts set to hit in january called the fiscal cliff. they allowed cameras in the room befo
these people and the results of this investigation, fulfilling compasses obligation to provide oversight of us we had many opportunities to improve and provide better protection in these opportunities run the gamut from following behavior of those who are in charge entities like mf global, to monitoring and modifying the ways in which the ratings agencies do their business, to their job. and there have been so many failures in so many ways, not only in mf global, but in other, similar stories in recent history. one common strand seems to be that we need to provide our regulators with better tools to pursue the enforcement of laws that existed prior to the massive imposition of dog crank. we do not have infinite resources and our financial marketplace. we do not have infinite resources to pursue every aspect of what regulators might want to pursue in dodd-frank, but they need to be able to dedicate resources to better following the nature of transactions in this rapidly evolving marketplace into understanding how they can curb the excesses of human nature in the case of mr. corzine by a more ef
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
and certification sufficient to prove the dog was reliable and include the use. second you have experts testify about whether what constitutes a good training program? >> not necessarily experts, but the officer that participated with the dog can testify as to what he and the ball went through to obtain the training certificate and certification. .. drugs will they weren't. what green -- white wooden bed trailer record to be adequate in that circumstance? >> that would be one of several shilling's that would make the training records adequate. also, we want to know whether there are destructors use in the field. however, i don't believe that the record supports -- and this is arguable the minutes training. all the state had for the initial training was deputy morris, a certificate, one certificate that said this dog was trained by the police department for 120 hours with deputy morris and another certificate saying that the stock was certified by narcotics certifications, again with deputy morrison of for one year. >> i guess what i'm asking you is, as a matter of law you want us to hold and th
nations, was the weight to get alongside these afghans, and we saw -- i was in kabul when the two u.s. officers were shot in the national military police coordination center in the moi. there was an absolute bizarre for those who were present on the day to -- doug touched on this as proximity with the afghans, and it's very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> [inaudible] >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful withdrawal of u.k. combat troops by the end of 2014. >> i absolutely understand the investments, and there's a lot of material. my headquarters absolutely understand how much we have got to move over the time? >> the overall general plan of withdrawal, will you be able to be successful do you think? >> yes, i will. noting, of course, that the national operation is inside a wider nato operation, and a great deal of work is being done in nato to deliver that coordination. >> thanks. >> i want the to ask along the table, are we seriously led to believe that on the january the 1st, 2015, that the afghan national security forces will be susta
to join us today. susan is the bureau chief of usa today where she writes about the white house and national policy and won a slew of awards for distinguished reporting on the presidency, but brandon smith memorial award for deadline reporting on the presidency and coverage of the presidency and a lot of other awards. use a regular guest hosts of the diane beam show on pbs and cnn and many other broadcast outlets. a native of wichita, kan. she received a bachelor's degree from northwest and journalism from columbia where she was a pulitzer fellow. she will be followed by vicki edwards to is electorate at princeton university's woodrow wilson school of public policy international affairs. .. great pleasure to be here with the four people for whom i have so much admiration and the wife quoted so much time and so many stories. i have i think a little bit of news which is i found out the title of the next book that is coming out between tom so you can figure out the 1992 book by renewing congress. it sounds pretty positive. 2000, the permanent campaign. okay maybe not entirely posit
out an electoral victory. we'd like to welcome everybody who's joining us now on c-span2. if you're on c-span 1, you have to switch over. if you had a friend that didn't switch over, run over there, pound on that door. you can join us at politico.com, there's an e-mail that will come directly to us onset. we're going to bring you into the conversation. it's 10:00, the polls have closed in most of the states that will determine the outcome of this election. i would say if you wanted to step back and where do we stand at 10:00 on election night, the big headline, the one headline we know for sure, joe donnelly won the senate seat for democrats in indiana, a huge and what unexpected victory for democrats, makes it almost impossible for republicans to win back the senate. we have declared long ago that the house will stay in republican hands, it now looks like the senate will stay in democratic hands. so it's all down to the presidential race about whether or not we have a status quo, divided government in washington. the early states that have been called are very much looking in ba
will continue to use. we will have a couple of days off and at thanksgiving and will have a couple of days off and maybe one or two off for the new year. but outside of that, the work continues in terms of american needs in this nation. >> host: do you foresee a hearing on sandy and its affect? >> guest: i anticipate -- i'm not sure if it would be necessarily at the federal level. but i know in terms of this -- i'm pretty confident that there will be some assessment. normally on a state-by-state level. again, looking at and evaluating and making pronouncements is what we can do better. there will be hearings. i'm not sure if it will escalate to the federal level. >> host: thank you, mignon cyburn and paul kirby. this is the tremont on c-span2. "communicators" on c-span2. .. >> on the aid of the 2012 election former u.s. representatives talked about competitive u.s. house and senate races around the country. panels includes former representative former chairs of the republican, democratic national committees. from the bipartisan policy center in washington, this is an hour and 20 minutes. [inau
of your affection. [applause] >> thank you. i was interested in architecture. i used to look at the cathedral's because of how beautiful they are and how serene, the but i very quickly became interested in how they were built. when you look at one of those european cathedrals you do think how did people get those enormous homes? beauvis had no power tools, know mathematics for constructing cranes and so on, and so i became interested in how it was done and eventually became interested in the society that produced the great cathedrals and the question that strikes anybody is why are they there so i became fascinated by that and quite early on in my career when i was still struggling to make it as a writer i had a go at writing a novel about building a cathedral. i felt jerry convinced it was a great popular novel to be written in the cathedral in about 1976, i wrote a few chapters on an outline and i sent them to my agent. he didn't like it at all and he was right and he said you are writing a tapestry and what you need is a series of linked melodrama. the truth of the matter
us. >> there is a lot of movement in the direction. so are we in ten years going to have our first two years -- >> we are starting to see that at this university. >> date recourses mostly. >> what me comment on that. for the last monday and tuesday on a chair in ann arbor are a major national science foundation workshop bringing in the top people from stanford, mit, carnegie mellon involved in this as well as a number of other leaders in these areas. .. >> this is not the education we think of as a college education, meaning on a campus with learning communities, the broader experience, but there are certain aspects of learning that occur. there are other formats here. there's a lot of talk about what carnegie melon caughts the open learning model, the intelligent tutor. this is an ai intelligence based interactive situation. i -- ithica and other groups do behind trails on this and found out techniques that are not involved at all, you learn twice as deep and twice as fast in certain areas. the third area, i guess it's called interest game, for those who know anything about scienc
israel was hard. does he agree with me that the use of long range imported missiles by hamas capable of striking jerusalem has made this much were difficult to achieve? >> yes, absolutely. it is clear that the armory of rockets in gaza has changed since the time of operation, and although there is a longer range rockets, we seen them launch at tel aviv and at least in one case at jerusalem. of course that is an escalation of the threat to israel. but it only underlines the importance of taking forward all the work on a negotiated piece and settlement in the middle east so which has been supported across the house. >> in august this year in a report that gaza would be unlivable by 2020, 44% of posting in gaza -- [inaudible] what conversation has he had with counterparts recently on increasing basic humanitarian coming into gaza and that continues to increase? >> this is a constant part of discussions with israeli leaders. of course, we put the case for that, and, indeed, more than that, in saying not only that humanitarian relief is required but that the difference in more an open app
will be live starting at 2 p.m. eastern, also on c-span3. here on c-span2, the u.s. senate gavels in and about half an hour at 9:30 a.m. eastern. they are expected to continue working on the 2013 defense programs policy bill, possible debate on 100th a minute and "roll call" votes happening throughout the day. senate lawmakers also continuing work on the floor on the fiscal cliff. majority whip senator dick durbin spoke about bipartisan negotiations to try to avoid the fiscal cliff at an event earlier this week at the center for american progress. we will show you as much of this as we can into the senate gavels in at 9:30 a.m. >> we are thrilled to have senator durbin to talk about his views on the fiscal cliff, and the framework. i think as we engage in this debate i just want to let a few things that are critical. as washington becomes obsessed with this issue. first and foremost, i think it will have consequences and that cap we have argued that the issues that are really framing the fiscal debate and fiscal cliff are ones that were actually dictated in the election context. the president
in this world than the u.s. military, to understand and think through all the secondary and tertiary, primary elements of a plan and how to execute it. so, leveraging that skill set and engaging with the appropriate authorities on how to respond to a health emergency, and how you would address these issues well before the incident occurs is probably the best solution. now, those teams probably exist to do that. but whether or not, it really depends on their maturity of that country and its ability to leverage very scarce resources. just like in the u.s., our health care professionals barely have enough time to address the day-to-day health care needs of the population, let alone planning for emergency. this is the challenge, but i think this is where the military and the u.s., in collaboration with its other federal partners, can be extraordinarily successful. >> in the back. i think we're probably just about running out of time, so the mic is behind you. core question. >> i'd like to refer back -- university of wisconsin republic referred back to ambassador hume's reference to the shipping i
injuring himself into a program at walter reed what it ended up using acupuncture, using meditation, using other techniques to wean him off of all the drugs that he was on, and through this program he actually was able to walk out of walter reed on his own two feet. so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for one, for allowing us to tell this story, both good and bad, but for recognizing this problem by recognizing that there is this problem of overmedication and that they are looking for outside the box ideas and how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film really, the metaphor of "escape fire" is the status quo isn't working and we need to start looking for outside the box ideas. >> more with matthew heineman, producer and director of "escape fire," the fight to rescue america's health care. sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> live picture from the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c., a discussion just getting underway with political analysts and pollsters taking a look at the election numbers and examining a voter turnout and
in advance of a disaster? i think all of us agree with that. .. being that building relations with the people rising sow africa and the specifically aimed at building a capacity for administering hiv treatment in a country where the civilian authorities said they would never allow it. your point is well taken and sometimes there are opportunities to do that. >> of i can also. one of the most important ways to prevent is to do credible and reliable health surveillance. in many countries for which we have no strong visibility on the presence of infectious disease and with such a mobile world, undetected infectious diseases are a threat to us all. >> thank you. >> if you can see the hands better than i can, people with their hands up, position yourself and we will get the next time around. >> thank you for your presentation. as you know, there has been a debate about what health can contribute to security. there is agreement that health intervention and human security, and also the united states has a major role in humanitarian spots and that is not necessarily driven by national security consid
taxes now, that is not going to play in my judgment with any of us. we are not for raising revenue paid, certainly. second, remember we're at the 18 months ago we passed the debt ceiling increase, and now it's time to do the second debt ceiling increase? we're just a couple months away from having to go to that debate again, and we get to do any of the promise cuts from the 115 months ago. so where are those? this idea that race accident, we promise we'll get to the cuts, now we promise we'll get to the customer american people are saying are you serious? i think is really problematic. >> let's understand the big picture here, and the presence of philosophy. i've been watching, i remember him looking us in the eye the date was february 10, 2009 when he was selling his economic stimulus plan, and he said fdr's new deal actually did work but he should've spent a lot more money and then the records would've shown it. it seemed to me he was looking at writing of unexplained, he convinced me that he is a keynesian economist on steroids. when i look at this sequestration deal, and the fiscal
are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: yes i would first like to congratulate the american people on using good sense by reelecting a president. mr. romney had no plans. he was just offering the opposite of what the president was presenting to the american people. have no plan for anything. i don't know how anybody in his position could get as far as he did with nothing to offer the american people. the other thing -- i just don't understand how with the american people would think to even consider him as the presidential candidate. he had absolutely nothing to offer. everything he offered was nonexistent or i will just do the president isn't doing. >> host: but the ask you, you sound like you're passionately supportive of the president. >> caller: i'm passionate for the country. i don't care who obama our romney is. i want somebody that will help the american people to progress. i want to see america -- >> host: you want compromise? >> caller: i want compromise, yes. but i'm going to tell you this, and make no mistake about it, we have people in this country that have completely destroyed rath
-span. up next, a house debate with u.s. representative and former republican presidential candidate michele bachmann and her democratic challenger, jim graves to represent minnesota's 6th congressional district. then at 9 a.m. eastern we are live with an analysis of the competitive house and senate races with two former congressmen, republican tom davis and democrat martin who each chaired their respective parties' campaign committees. >> when i watch c-span, i watch the morning journal. i like the give and take there. i like the balanced approach. and i also like to hear the callers. i don't call myself, but i like to hear the callers. some of them are unusual, to say the least. some of them are thought-provoking too. c-span is everywhere. c-span in washington is just at every event, you know, small hearing, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in many 1979 -- in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, representative michele bachmann faces
today, it is important to use the microphone and he will do better than i will. i should turn it up. thank you for your interest. i would like to introduce the topic that we will focus on this morning. then i will turn it over to a discussion with our panelists and get you involved. we are talking right now about research scholarships and the arts. at the public universities. in essence, what we are talking about, it is the faculty. the faculty and who they are, as well as the teacher faculty, including the graduate students. i would argue that we are in a time of huge challenge in the ability of public universities to recruit the best and retain the best and to sustain the kind of conditions that create outstanding scholarships, as well as teaching. it is little remembered today, and i find that when i speak to audiences in the public, 50 years ago it was not a given that the best programs or finance programs were private institutions. from much of the history, the very best would be in the public. people have heard it say that the berkeley physics department, although now, every y
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